FAQs

Welding & Joining

rourke_953

For many years the only recommended way to assemble a frame was by fillet brazing or brazing with lugs, and this was the way 531 frames were constructed. When Reynolds introduced 753, due to the nature of the material, these tubes needed to be low temperature silver soldered.

We now have a new generation of materials in 525, 725, 631, 853 and 953 steels. All of these can be brazed, but the most popular method of assembly is by TIG welding. (on 853 we do recommend that gear fittings etc are silver soldered onto the tubes).

There are many filler wires that can be used on 525/725/631/853 like ER-70S-6.

For materials like titanium, special welding equipment and procedures are required to ensure that oxygen does not contaminate the weld areas. The 953 range is also subject to recommended practice for stainless steels in addition to the skills needed for fabricating with thin wall tubes. On 953, we only have tested the stainless 17-4PH grade wire although other wires may work.

Our literature shows the frame builder the butt profile in each tube. Some have equal butt lengths at each end, others have one long end and one short. All the tubes are marked with the Reynolds name at the short butt end, so trimming should be done at the opposite end, unless a very small frame is being built and then the builder may trim both ends.

For many years the only tubes available to the frame builder were the standard “road” and “touring” sets. Now with so many different frames being built (road, touring, Audax, BMX, freestyle etc) Reynolds no longer sell in standard sets. For each material we provide the frame builder with a list of all the tubes available. From this they will pick the tubes most suitable for the application and the rider.

For motorcycle applications, please contact our official distributor shown on theĀ Contact Us page.

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